Articles

Overcoming alcohol addiction

Click to read full article

Set goals and prepare for change

1.

Do you want to stop drinking altogether or just cut back? If reduction is your goal, decide which days you will drink alcohol and how many drinks are allowed. Commit to at least 2 days each week where you won't drink at all.

2.

When do you want to start? Set a specific date.

Cutting back vs. quitting alcohol

1.

Set a drinking goal/ limit, write down and keep it where you will frequently see it

2.

Keep a record of your drinking. Write down every time you have a drink, how much you drink. Review the results.

3.

Cut down drinking at home

4.

Drink slower

5.

Schedule 1 or 2 alcohol-free days each week. Then, stop drinking for 1 week. Note down how you feel physically and mentally on these days - recognising the benefits may help you to cut down for good.

Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms usually start within hours after you stop drinking, peak in a day or two, and improve within five days. But in some alcoholics, withdrawal is not just unpleasant - it can be life-threatening.
Below are some symptoms:
1. Headache
2. Shaking
3. Sweating
4. Nausea or vomiting
5. Anxiety and restlessness
6. Stomach cramps and diarrhoea
7. Trouble sleeping or concentrating
8. Elevated heart rate and blood pressure

Life-threatening withdrawal symptoms

Please seek medical help immediately if you experience any of the following withdrawal symptoms:
1. Severe vomitting
2. Confusion and disorientation
3. Fever
4. Hallucinations
5. Extreme agitation
6. Seizures or convulsions

How to move forward

1.

Get support: Lean on family and friends, build a sober social network, and prioritise and turn up for meetings of recovery support groups

2.

Find new meaning in life where drinking no longer has a place

3.

Plan for triggers and cravings, avoid drinking triggers, practise saying no to alcohol in social situations, remind yourself the reasons to not drink, distract yourself, or accept the urge and ride it out instead of fighting it

Handling setbacks in recovery

What to do if you slip:
1. Get rid of the alcohol and get away from the setting
2. Remind yourself that one drink or a brief lapse doesn’t have to turn into a full-blown relapse
3. Don’t let feelings of guilt or shame keep you from getting back on track
4. Call your sponsor, counsellor, or a supportive friend right away for help
A drinking relapse doesn’t mean you’re a failure or that you’ll never be able to reach your goal. Don't give up!

How to help someone stop drinking

1.

Talk to the person about their drinking

2.

Learn all you can about addiction

3.

Take action, offer support throughout their recovery journey

4.

Don't make excuses for their behaviours, they need to take responsibility for their actions

5.

Don't blame yourself

Read full article

Is this article useful?

Leave your review!

Star
Star
Star
Star
Star