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To change or not to change: The dilemma of switching one's major

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Should you change your major?

1.

Follow your heart - think about what you find interesting and meaningful, so that you feel happy and confident as a student

2.

Ask yourself - why did you choose your current course in the first place?

3.

Will you encounter the same problems if you change your course?

4.

Do you really know your desired programme?

5.

Is getting a degree a must-have for the industry?

6.

Do not overlook the admin matters

Why you might not want to change your major

1.

You're almost done with the course

2.

Financial issues

3.

Costs of delaying your graduation for more than 1 year

Mitigation plans

1.

Take a second major/ minor

2.

Take more electives in the field that interests you the most

3.

There are many examples of students who were not fanatic about their existing course of study, but still pulled through and ended up doing something else in the career they want

4.

Engage in other activities as a side hobby/ hustle

Have you discussed this with anyone?

It is important to involve others in your decision-making process (e.g. family and friends). They might help you figure out why you're losing interest in your course if you're not sure yourself. Talking to your parents is encouraged if your tuition grant no longer covers some parts of your school fees.

How to move forward

1.

Do more research (e.g. browsing forums/ asking other students)

2.

Talk to your family and friends so that you can have people who will keep you grounded

3.

Tap into your school's resources (e.g. career advisors)

4.

Draw up a plan - consider every path, and the pros and cons of each

If you've decided:

To change your course - start by submitting the application and wait for the outcome!
Not to change your course - consider why you're unhappy and how you can mitigate the external factors and cope with the internal ones

The larger picture

In many industries, the relevance of one's study does not matter that much. You can always take relevant modules to demonstrate your interest, or apply for an internship in the desired industry.
Unless you're aiming for a very specific/ technical area of employment, your degree matters less now. Nevertheless, it is important to consider short-term sacrifices vs. long-term benefits.

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